A Brief History On this date, September 28, 48 BC, Pompey the Great was assassinated on the orders of King Ptolemy of Egypt after landing in Egypt.  Although we know of this incident, many open problems concern Ancient Egypt, and some of them may never be solved.  Egyptian archaeology is in a state of constant transition, with much of the terminology and chronology in dispute.  The archaeological record is incomplete, with countless relics and artifacts missing or destroyed.  New archaeological discoveries can call into question previous conclusions about Ancient Egypt.  Furthermore, there are internal problems of overall cohesion of various…

A Brief History On September 26, 1944, Operation Market Garden came to an end, failing to take all the objectives and suffering greater losses than the Germans, a fairly unusual occurrence at that point in the war.  Normally maddeningly conservative, Field Marshall Bernard Law Montgomery placed his faith in a rapid advance to and across the Rhine by seizing a series of bridges including parachute drops on a large scale. Digging Deeper Particularly unsuccessful was the assault on the bridge at Arnhem over the Rhine, the most important of all the bridges targeted.  British paratroopers briefly held one end of…

A Brief History On September 25, 1066, the Battle of Stamford Bridge signaled the end of the Viking invasions of England.  This significant English victory was soon superseded by the Battle of Hastings only 3 weeks later, in which the Normans under William the Conqueror defeated the British.  Bridges have often been focal points of battles, often pivotal ones of great importance.  Here we list 10 Battles at Bridges that are either famous or significant.  (The order of listing does not signify importance.)  (Note:  See tomorrow’s article about the ill fated attack on bridges during World War II called Operation…

A Brief History On September 20, 1835, Brazilian rebels captured Porto Alegre, starting a rebellion that lasted almost 10 years called The Ragamuffin War.  The longest war against the Imperial Brazilian government (and second bloodiest), the Ragamuffin war raged between southern, rural “Ragamuffins” or “Gauchos” (cowboys) that wanted a Republican form of government against the northern portion of the country. Digging Deeper Despite an offer of amnesty and peace in 1840, the rebels continued the fight even though no realistic chance of winning existed.  The famed Italian revolutionary and uniter, Giuseppe Garibaldi, came to assist the rebels in 1839 and…

A Brief History On September 20, 1982, the television show The $10,000 Pyramid was renamed The $25,000 Pyramid, with its host being American Bandstand and New Year’s Eve impresario Dick Clark.  Upon Dick’s death in 2012,  CBS reported that his estate was in the  “hundreds of millions.”  His third and final wife (of 35 years), Kari Wigton, can therefor be said to have hit her own jackpot by hooking up with such a successful Dick.  Here we list lucky ladies who can proudly claim they had or have their own “Dick.” Digging Deeper 10. Kari Wigton, Dick Clark. Clark’s previous marriages had lasted…

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