Browsing: Business and Economics

A Brief History On January 31, 1846, the result of the Milwaukee Bridge War was the formation of Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Fought over a bridge being built over the Milwaukee River, two of the three settlements in the area, Juneautown and Kilbourntown, were highly competitive with each other and along with Walker’s Point were incorporated as the Village of Milwaukee in 1839. Digging Deeper The intense rivalry between the leading citizens of each area boiled over in 1845 when one of the several bridges in the village was struck by a schooner sparking rumors of an intentional ramming.  The Kilbourntown people…

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A Brief History On January 18, 2008, the Euphronios Krater, a bowl for mixing wine with water that dates back to around 515 BC, was unveiled in Rome, Italy after having been stolen from an Etruscan tomb in 1971 and then held by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City since 1972. Digging Deeper Many other ancient or old items have been taken to foreign lands without the consent of their home country, and we ask, “Should these treasures be returned?”  Some of those items include: Panels and art from The Amber Room in Russia, looted by Germans during…

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A Brief History On January 7, 1894, Ohio born uber-inventor Thomas Edison made and demonstrated a kinetoscope, a sort of device using multiple photos or drawings to show the illusion of movement, in this case of a man sneezing.  Although Edison is often given credit for inventing the “motion picture,” his own employee, William Kennedy Dickson, actually received the patent for motion picture film on that same day. Digging Deeper Edison is often cited as the most prolific inventor in history, and it is his name on 1,093 patents, although more modern inventors have dramatically eclipsed this number.  Edison’s real…

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A Brief History On December 30, 2009, the Lanzhou–Zhengzhou–Changsha diesel oil pipeline in Shaanxi, China, suffered a rupture and spilled about 40,000 gallons of fuel into the Wei River and on to the Yellow River.  An environmental disaster, but at least nobody was killed. Digging Deeper Transporting oil, other liquids, and gasses that might be toxic or flammable is dangerous, regardless of the manner of transport.  Trains, trucks, ships, and pipelines are susceptible to accidents, natural disasters, and sabotage, and have all suffered disasters. Some notable pipeline disasters include the LaSalle Heights, Quebec natural gas explosion in 1965 that left…

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A Brief History On December 27, 1935, Regina Jonas was ordained as the first female Rabbi in the Jewish faith.  Born in Germany in 1902, she died during the Holocaust at Auschwitz in 1944, although her legacy lives on. Digging Deeper Women have made inroads to formerly forbidden jobs, but there are still many areas where the fairer sex has yet to achieve certain status.  Some of those positions not yet achieved by a woman include President of the US, which is probably overdue considering over 60 countries have had a woman as head of state or head of government,…

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