A Brief History On July 19, 2019, as our nation celebrates National Daiquiri Day, that wonderful concoction with Rum and fruit juices, usually served over ice or as a “frozen” drink, we reflect on those other liquid refreshments that are also named after a place.  Previously we discussed “10 Favorite Foods and Drinks Named After a Place” and today we do it again, but this time limited to fluid libations.  (On that previous list we mentioned Champagne, Pilsner/Pilsener Beer, Bourbon Whiskey and Scotch Whisky.) Digging Deeper 10. Long Island Iced Tea. How many drinks from New York could you name…

A Brief History On July 19, 1588, during the Anglo-Spanish War’s Battle of Gravelines, the ultimately doomed Spanish Armada was sighted in the English Channel.  The next couple of weeks were among the most harrowing in English and Spanish history.  Indeed, human history is full of exciting and often tragic events. The turning points in world history is an exciting topic for a discussion, but it might take us too long to discuss all of them. So, some of the most prominent events include: Early humans discovering and using fire; The fall of the Roman Empire; The period of the…

A Brief History On July 18, 1290, King Edward I of England, also known as “Edward Longshanks” or alternatively “The Hammer of the Scots,” issued the Edict of Expulsion, a royal decree ordering all Jews out of England.  At the time, about 16,000 Jews resided in not so Merry Old England.  Along with so many other pogroms, massacres, and forcible expulsions, Jewish people have had such a history of discrimination and exclusion that they have their own day of fasting and remembrance of various calamities and disasters, called Tisha B’Av, known as the “saddest day on the Jewish calendar.” Digging…

A Brief History On January 10, 1929, a house car, a type of recreational vehicle, named Harriet was present at the Tin Can Tourists convention in Arcadia, Florida.  By the 1920s, the recreational vehicle, often abbreviated as RV, was well established in the United States of America, with RV camping clubs established across the country.  The term “RV” is thus relatively new.  It has been only in the past 50 to 60 years that people began referring to campers and travel trailers as RVs.  Let us see what else you might not know about recreational vehicles, RVing and the people…

A Brief History On August 6, 1945, near end of World War II, a modified B-29 dropped a uranium gun-type (“Little Boy”) bomb on Hiroshima.  Three days later, on August 9, a plutonium implosion (“Fat Man”) bomb was dropped by another B-29 on Nagasaki. The bombs immediately devastated their targets and, over the next two to four months, the acute effects of the atomic bombings killed 90,000–146,000 people in Hiroshima and 39,000–80,000 people in Nagasaki.  World War II was one of the most deadly wars in history.  Over 15,000,000 people were killed in combat. 25,000,000 more were wounded.   The death toll was catastrophic.  In…

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