Browsing: December 27

A Brief History This article presents a chronological list of notable events that happened on December 27th.  For each date below, please click on the date to be taken to an article covering that date’s event. Digging Deeper On December 27, 1512, the King and Queen of Spain issued the Laws of Burgos, a set of rules for how Spaniards were to treat Native Americans in the Caribbean islands colonized by Spain. On December 27, 1771, French engineer, Henri Pitot, died at the age of 76. On December 27, 1922, the Imperial Japanese Navy commissioned the first aircraft carrier in…

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A Brief History On December 27, 1935, Regina Jonas was ordained as the first female Rabbi in the Jewish faith.  Born in Germany in 1902, she died during the Holocaust at Auschwitz in 1944, although her legacy lives on. Digging Deeper Women have made inroads to formerly forbidden jobs, but there are still many areas where the fairer sex has yet to achieve certain status.  Some of those positions not yet achieved by a woman include President of the US, which is probably overdue considering over 60 countries have had a woman as head of state or head of government,…

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A Brief History On December 27, 1771, French engineer, Henri Pitot, died at the age of 76.  Although you may not be familiar with him, his invention, the Pitot Tube, has probably served you well in your life, as it is the primary instrument used for measuring the speed of aircraft and boats, as well as other liquids and gases.  Today, we take time to remember some of the famous folks that died on December 27th. Digging Deeper 1834: Charles Lamb, English essayist and poet. 1836: Stephen Austin, known as “The Father of Texas” and the namesake of the state’s…

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A Brief History On December 27, 1512, the King and Queen of Spain issued the Laws of Burgos, a set of rules for how Spaniards were to treat Native Americans in the Caribbean islands colonized by Spain.  Prior to this point there was haphazard ways of dealing with Native peoples, and ample incidents of cruelty and oppression.  The European “discovery” of the Americas was only 20 years old at this time, and by this time it had become apparent some consistent rules were needed to keep with Catholic and Spanish ideas of law and morality. Digging Deeper The name, Laws…

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A Brief History On December 27, 1966, the largest cave in the world was discovered in Aquismón, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.  Boasting a single cavern that covers a ground space of 994 feet long by 442 feet wide, the so called Cave of Swallows (alternately called “The Cave of the Swallows”) had been known for many generations by indigenous Huastec people, and was considered “discovered” only when a documented descent into the cave was made by T. R. Evans, Charles Borland and Randy Sterns, the first outsiders known to have visited the cave. Digging Deeper Known as a “pit” type…

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