Browsing: December 27

A Brief History On December 27, 1966, the largest cave in the world was discovered in Aquismón, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.  Boasting a single cavern that covers a ground space of 994 feet long by 442 feet wide, the so called Cave of Swallows (alternately called “The Cave of the Swallows”) had been known for many generations by indigenous Huastec people, and was considered “discovered” only when a documented descent into the cave was made by T. R. Evans, Charles Borland and Randy Sterns, the first outsiders known to have visited the cave. Digging Deeper Known as a “pit” type…

A Brief History On December 27, 2017, we stand on the brink of a new year, giving us cause to look back on the year that is finishing.  As with every year, many notable people died this past year, and we list 10 of the most significant or interesting of the Class of 2017.  Many people you might add to the list are included in the “honorable mentions,” but feel free to tell us who else we should have listed.  (Dishonorable mention: Roger Ailes, Fox TV boss and sexual harasser; Manuel Noriega, dictator) Digging Deeper 1. Hugh Hefner, magazine magnate. Founder…

A Brief History On December 27, 2001, the People’s Republic of China, aka “Red” China, or just plain old “China,” was granted status as Permanent Normal Trade Relations with the United States, a label formerly known as “Most Favored Nation” status.  (Note: this date is somewhat confusing vis a vis some of the other dates referred to within because of differing sources.) Digging Deeper Due to the history of GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 1948) which became the World Trade Organization (WTO, 1994) the US did not have normal trade relations with Communist China due to Cold War…

A Brief History On December 27, 1922, the Imperial Japanese Navy commissioned the first aircraft carrier in the world that was designed and built as an aircraft carrier, the Hōshō. Digging Deeper Prior to the Hōshō, some ships such as the USS Langley CV-1 were converted (in 1920) to aircraft carriers from other warships or merchant ships.  The Royal Navy (British) Ark Royal is probably the first of what we would recognize as a more or less modern carrier, commissioned as a carrier in 1914 after being converted from a freighter that was in the process of being built in…

A Brief History On December 27, 1929, Soviet dictator Josef Stalin signed an order to “eliminate the Kulaks as a class,” resulting in a sort of genocide.  The Kulaks were not an ethnic group but rather a social class that in today’s United States would be the equivalent of the upper working class or the lower middle class.  In the Soviet Union, Kulaks were the upper class of peasants who had accumulated more property, wealth and power than the lower-class peasants. Digging Deeper Stalin sought to separate the Kulaks into 3 main groups, the first of which were those to be executed.  The second group…

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