Browsing: April 18

A Brief History On April 18, 1942, Lt. Col. Jimmy Doolittle led one of the most famous bombing raids in aviation history when he led 16 B-25 medium bombers over Tokyo, Kobe, Nagoya and Yokohama, Japan. After the devastating sneak attack against Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, the US military in the Pacific was reeling, as was the shocked and furious American public. With one Japanese success after another, the US finally mounted an offensive action by flying 16 stripped down B-25B Mitchell twin engine medium bombers off the deck of the USS Hornet, something that had never been…

A Brief History On April 18, 1857, Frenchman Hippolyte Leon Denizard Rivail, writing under the nom de plume Allan Kardec, published The Spirits Book, marking the beginning of the Spiritism philosophy (or religion or movement, if you prefer).  Today, the International Spiritist Council has representatives in 35 countries with its headquarters in Brasilia, Brazil. Digging Deeper The publishing of The Spirits Book is celebrated by Spiritists, and today, April 18, 2017, is National Day of Spiritism in the United States.  The total number of adherents is unknown, but said to be in the millions, with 5 million followers in Brazil…

A Brief History Religious reformer Martin Luther refused to recant during his trial for heresy on April 18, 1521, but what might you not know about him? Digging Deeper 10. Luther received a Doctor of Theology degree from the University of Wittenberg in 1512. He had earlier earned 2 bachelor’s degrees.  He received a bachelor’s degree in Biblical studies in 1508 and another bachelor’s degree in the Sentences by Peter Lombard in 1509. 9. Although Luther believed that “holy war” or religious wars were against God’s will, the same war fought for secular reasons were permissible, or even desirable! Meanwhile, Luther’s…

A Brief History On Good Friday, somewhere around 33 AD Jesus of Nazareth, prophet to Islam and Judaism, the Christ and Savior to Christians, was crucified by the Romans in Jerusalem. Crucifixion was a particularly brutal and drawn out process of execution often reserved for “dangerous” criminals, ones that threatened the status quo.  Here we list 10 notable cases where a person was crucified. Digging Deeper 10. Inaros II, 454 BC. Also known as Inarus, this Egyptian was a rebel against the Persian occupiers.  Allying himself with the Athenians, the Persians eventually won and captured Inaros, executing him by crucifixion. …

A Brief History On April 18, 1988, the US Navy retaliated against the Navy of Iran in response to the USS Samuel Roberts being damaged by a mine. Digging Deeper Iran and Iraq engaged in an 8 year war that threatened to stop the flow of oil in the Persian Gulf, something that would have catastrophic economic consequences for the US and Europe. The US Navy was escorting oil tankers through the Gulf when the USS Samuel Roberts had the misfortune to run into a mine, blowing a huge 25 foot hole in the ship.  Although no US sailors were…