A Brief History On August 19, 1940, the B-25 Mitchell was flown for the first time.  Although its service life did not extend as long as many other airplanes, this medium bomber was adapted for a huge variety of uses and configurations, making it one of the most versatile aircraft ever.  Here 6 (well, okay, actually 7) such multi-purpose aircraft are listed in the order the author finds most interesting or exciting.  What types of planes would you include on the list? Digging Deeper 6.  De Haviland DH.98 Mosquito. Entering service in 1941 as a high-speed unarmed bomber, the Mosquito was built mostly of wood, giving…

A Brief History On August 19, 1612, three women from Samlesbury in Lancashire, England were put on trial for witchcraft.  Just yesterday History and Headlines featured an article about another Lancashire witch trial.  In this article we present to you the Samlesbury witch trials and also discuss a case of 5 witches who were executed on the same date in Salem, Massachusetts but in 1692. Digging Deeper Accused by a 14-year old girl of practicing witchcraft, three women in Samlesbury were brought to trial.  They were accused of cannibalism and of having murdered a child and were charged with “maleficium,” harm by means of witchcraft.  Fortunately they were acquitted, something of a wonder in…

A Brief History On August 18, 1587, Virginia Dare was born in the Roanoke Colony in what is now North Carolina.  Each year the current residents of Roanoke Island celebrate her birthday with an Elizabethan Renaissance Festival. Digging Deeper Whereas the date of death is often known for many famous people throughout history, their births were mostly insignificant and thus not recorded.  For Virginia the exact opposite is true.  As the first child born to English settlers on the North American continent, her birth is important.  This is largely where her story also ends.  In fact it is unknown if and when…

 A Brief History On August 18, 1920, the United States ratified the 19th Amendment to the Constitution.  This move gave American women the right to vote, also known as women’s suffrage.  Women have always struggled to be treated as equals to men, both under the law and in common practice.  Here we list 10 of the laws, inventions or events that have helped bring equality to the sexes.  The emphasis is on American history.  In case you think anything is missing, please mention it in the comments section. Digging Deeper 10.  1st Co-ed College in the United States (Oberlin), 1837. Not only was this…

A Brief History On August 18, 1612, the trials of the “Pendle Witches” began in England.  22 years later to the day, across the Channel in France, Urbain Grandier was convicted of sorcery and burned alive.  Apparently the 18th of August is not a good day to be a witch in Europe, at least not back in the 17th century. Digging Deeper The 12 accused witches of Pendle Hill in Lancashire, England were suspected of having used witchcraft to murder 10 people.  One died in prison.  Of the 11 who went to trial (2 men and 9 women), 10 were found guilty and hanged.  Only 1…

1 488 489 490 491 492 545