A Brief History “Dracula’s Guest” is a short story by Irish author Bram Stoker (1847-1912) first published in 1914, two years after Stoker’s death, and now in the public domain.  It is widely believed that “Dracula’s Guest” is actually the deleted first chapter from the original Dracula manuscript, which the publisher thought was superfluous to the story. Digging Deeper: The Story When we started for our drive the sun was shining brightly on Munich, and the air was full of the joyousness of early summer. Just as we were about to depart, Herr Delbruck (the maitre d’hotel of the Quatre Saisons,…

A Brief History In June of 2015, the Treasury Department announced that Alexander Hamilton, first Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, who has graced the $10 U.S. bill since 1929 will be replaced by the image of a woman in the year 2020.  No decision has yet been made about who will be selected, although the Treasury stated that it would probably be someone who represents for “our inclusive democracy.” Digging Deeper A little known fact is that women have already appeared on U.S. paper bills, in fact twice – namely inaugural First Lady Martha Washington and Native American princess Pocahontas. U.S. money has also included fictional characters such as…

A Brief History On June 29, 1972, the Supreme Court of the United States stunned the nation by ruling in Furman v. Georgia that the death penalty violated the 8th and 14th Amendments.  This decision basically outlawed capital punishment until each state that wanted to reinstate it reworked their laws and procedures to meet Supreme Court guidelines. Digging Deeper It seems that over 200 years of previous experience had not perfected the procedure.  The court found judicial practices so arbitrary and inconsistent that a grossly uneven administration of capital punishment was the result.  So much so, that it constituted cruel and unusual punishment.  In wake…

A Brief History On June 28, 1997,  shocked referee Mills Lane stopped the heavyweight championship fight between “Iron Mike” Tyson and Evander “The Real Deal” Holyfield because Tyson had bit off a chunk of Holyfield’s ear. Digging Deeper Tyson is known to be erratic, with a checkered past that included juvenile offenses, jail time for rape (convicted 1992), another jail stint (assault, 1998), domestic violence and getting a tattoo over his face the day before a fight, causing the fight to be cancelled.  In one fight he would not stop punching his opponent when the fight was over and ended…

A Brief History On June 25, 1998, the US Supreme Court voted 6-3 to strike down the Line Item Veto Act of 1996.  It is said that politics makes for strange bedfellows, and this was an example of just that. Digging Deeper After Democrat Bill Clinton was elected President in 1992, the Republicans mounted a major surge in the mid-term elections of 1994 and achieved their dreamed of majority in congress.  One promise these Republicans had made was to enact a line item veto law allowing the President to veto only a specific portion of a larger bill that was…

1 488 489 490 491 492 616