November 13-14, 2015: Je suis Paris!

Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn Tumblr +

A Brief History

On the evening of 13 November 2015, a series of coordinated terrorist attacks occurred in Paris, France and its northern suburb Saint-Denis.  The attacks consisted of mass shootings, suicide bombings, bombings, and hostage taking, including bombings near the Stade de France in Saint-Denis.  The deadliest attack was at the Bataclan theatre where attackers took hostages and engaged in a standoff with police until it was ended on 14 November 2015.

Digging Deeper

At least 129 people were killed, 89 of them at the Bataclan theatre.  More than 350 people were injured by the attacks, including 99 people described as being in a serious condition.  In addition to the civilian casualties, eight attackers were killed and authorities continue to search for any accomplices that remain at large.

Everyone at History and Headlines is sickened by the evil actions of the Islamic State and its sympathizers in carrying out this atrocious attack against the civilized world.  We strongly condemn such inexcusable acts of violence against citizens of many nations, including not just this latest attack in Paris, but also the 12 November 2015 bombings in Beirut that took 43 lives and the 31 October 2015 crash of Metrojet Flight 9268 in Egypt that cost 224 lives.

As someone who has visited Paris on multiple occasions and with friends living in France, I say to my French friends, “Je suis Paris!”

If you liked this article and would like to receive notification of new articles, please feel welcome to subscribe to History and Headlines by entering your email address at the top right of this page or like us on Facebook.

Your readership is much appreciated!

Historical Evidence

To display your support for the people of Paris, please see…

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B017YFO9BO”]

[AMAZONPRODUCTS asin=”B017Z6PP8I”]

 

Share.

About Author

Dr. Zar

Dr. Zar graduated with a B.A. in French and history, a Master’s in History, and a Ph.D. in History. He currently teaches history at multiple universities in Ohio and has presented research papers in Europe and North America.