Browsing: October 28

A Brief History On October 28, 2018, we have such deserving jerks, idiots, creeps and scumbags that we just cannot wait until the end of the month!  These people are so bad, we have to “honor” them right now.  Hopefully there will not be any other total goofs in the next couple days, but if there are, we will amend our list by adding them as well later.  As always, if you think someone was wrongly listed here, please tell us and be sure to specify whey you think that way.  If we overlooked any truly deserving jerks, let us…

A Brief History On October 28, 1886, President Grover Cleveland dedicated the Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World), that great beacon of freedom welcoming immigrants into New York Harbor, for many, the gateway to a better life in the United States.  Today we list 10 statues that we think are the most famous, most notable, and most significant.  What artworks would you add to this list?  (Note: The order listed has no significance, and we only considered statues that still exist.) Digging Deeper 1. The Statue of Liberty, New York City. A gift to the people of the United States…

A Brief History On October 28, 1956, Elvis Aron Presley (yes, only 1 “a” in Aron) made medical history by being inoculated with a Polio vaccine shot on national television, demonstrating to a dubious country that getting such a vaccine was safe. Digging Deeper This gesture by the most famous Rock and Roller of all time was instrumental in raising the number of American children inoculated against Polio from .6% to a whopping 80+% in only 6 months. The Polio family of disease had been devastating American (and world wide) children, including 4 term US President Franklin Roosevelt. Researchers had…

A Brief History On October 28, 1948, Swiss chemist Paul Muller was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology for his work in 1939 demonstrating the effectiveness of DDT as an insecticide. Digging Deeper As you can tell by the date of the research, World War II interfered with normal international scientific intercourse, resulting in the delay in recognition for Muller.  The DDT itself did not wait for the end of the war to make itself useful, and was put to widespread use, mainly by the United States, to greatly reduce the incidence of insect borne diseases in war…

A Brief History On October 28, 2004, Seattle Mariners star Ichiro Suzuki, the first major league baseball (MLB) player to come from Japan, broke George Sisler’s treasured 84-year-old record by hitting 262 balls in one season.  Suzuki, better known simply as Ichiro, had come to the U.S. to play professional baseball after already being a star in Japan. Digging Deeper Starting with being named the American League (AL) Rookie of the Year in 2001, Ichiro made an impression on American baseball that will be hard to forget.  10 seasons in a row he smacked 200 or more hits (a record).  He has been an American League most valuable player (MVP), an…

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