Browsing: November 2

A Brief History On November 2, 1951, a single platoon of the Royal Canadian Regiment fighting in the Korean War on behalf of the United Nations held off a persistent attack by an entire Chines battalion.  The Battle of the Song-gok Spur lasted all day and all night into the next day.  Such heroism has been routine for Canadian soldiers, sailors, and airmen through the years, and Korea was no exception.  Over 26,000 Canadians served in Korea during the War, and over 500 of them gave their lives in the cause of freedom. Digging Deeper (We recently replied to a…

A Brief History On November 2, 2017, we answer reader requests to tell them about the Russian equivalent of the American military headquarters building known as “The Pentagon.”  In just a few words, the Russian equivalent of our Pentagon is known as The Main Building of the Ministry of Defense. (Note: This building is NOT to be confused with the Kremlin.  The Kremlin is an entirely different structure, consisting of fortified government buildings surrounded by a wall that is more akin to our White House than it is to our Pentagon.) Digging Deeper Like the American Pentagon, the Russians (then the Soviet…

A Brief History On November 2, 2004, the great grand nephew of artist Vincent van Gogh, Theo van Gogh, age 47, was brutally murdered by an Islamic terrorist while cycling in Amsterdam. Van Gogh was a movie maker, screen writer and television producer, and had completed a short film called Submission, a movie about the subjugation of women in Islamic countries. Needless to say, the routine death threats followed against Van Gogh and his Somali collaborator, causing his partner, Aayan Hirsi Ali to blow off the threat, saying, “Nobody kills the village idiot” (meaning herself). Digging Deeper Moroccan-Dutch idiot, Mohammed…

A Brief History On November 2, 1900, Dr. Jacob Gould Schurman (1854-1942), President of the First Philippine Commission, stated, “Should our power by any fatality be withdrawn, the commission believe that the government of the Philippines would speedily lapse into anarchy, which would excuse, if it did not necessitate, the intervention of other powers and the eventual division of the islands among them. Only through American occupation, therefore, is the idea of a free, self-governing, and united Philippine commonwealth at all conceivable.  And the indispensable need from the Filipino point of view of maintaining American sovereignty over the archipelago is…

A Brief History On November 2, 1898, the day recognized as the “birth of cheerleading,” University of Minnesota student Johnny Campbell became the first cheerleader in history, directing fans in cheering on the Golden Gophers football team. UM proudly calls itself the “Birthplace of Cheerleading,” and apparently deserves that title. Digging Deeper During the 1800’s crowds at sporting events began to cheer on their teams, increasingly in unison.  The 1890’s saw the first use of the word “cheerleader” referring to fans in the stands that would start cheers.  Not surprisingly, Minnesota saw this trend evolve with Thomas Peebles, an alumnus,…

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