Browsing: June 6

A Brief History On June 6, 1985, authorities in Embu, Brazil opened the grave of a person purported to be “Wolfgang Gerhard,” in order to determine the true identity of the person buried under that name.  Investigation proved the actual body to be that of Dr. Josef Mengele, in infamous Nazi doctor that terrorized innocent people at the Auschwitz extermination camp in Poland during World War II, earning Mengele the terrible moniker, “The Angel of Death.” Digging Deeper The regime that ran Germany prior to and during World War II, known as The Third Reich, was ruled by dictator Adolf…

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A Brief History In 1939, German scientist Adolf Friedrich Johann Butenandt won the Noble Prize in Chemistry for his work on sex hormones, while Croatian-Swiss scientist Leopold Ruzicka co-won for his work on polymethylenes and higher terpenes. Both men had previously and independently partially synthesized testosterone from a cholesterol base. Digging Deeper Testosterone is the primary male sexual hormone in humans and is also what is called an anabolic steroid, an androgen that helps males build the heavier muscular and skeletal body mass that differentiates men from women. Testosterone keeps men healthy and strong, prevents osteoporosis and contributes to male…

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A Brief History On June 6, 1944, the character played by Robert Mitchum in the movie The Longest Day (1960), Brigadier General Norman Cota, makes a stirring announcement to his men who are under heavy enemy fire and terrified of moving forward: “Only two kinds of people are gonna stay on this beach — those that are already dead and those that are gonna die. Now get off your butts! You guys are the Fightin’ 29th!” It turns out Norman Cota was a real US Army General (eventually Major General) and he really did rally his men of the 29th…

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A Brief History On June 8, 2017, we sit on the eve of the premier of the 2017 blockbuster monster movie, The Mummy.  Lucky for us, we got to see an early screening of the movie on June 6, 2017, and in RealD 3D no less! Digging Deeper The screening audience filled the theater, and the film elicited an enthusiastic vocal reaction from the crowd throughout.  Gasps, oohs, ahhs, peals of laughter and exclaimed comments were sprinkled liberally throughout the presentation, the type of experience that makes seeing a movie in a crowded theater so much more exciting than watching…

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A Brief History On June 6, 1822, a Canadian fur trapper “voyageur” was accidentally shot in the stomach with a musket, leaving him with a hole that healed open, leading to extensive study of the human digestive tract. Digging Deeper A French-Canadian woodsman, St. Martin was 20 years old when the musket shot him at close range at a fur trading post on Mackinac Island. The local US Army doctor, surgeon Dr. William Beaumont attended to the terrible wound that was expected by all observers to prove fatal. Instead, the wound healed into a fistula, an open hole through St.…

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