Browsing: June 15

A Brief History On June 15, 1936, the Vickers Wellington twin engine bomber made its maiden flight. The bomber would be produced from 1936 until the end of World War II in 1945, with a massive production run of well over 11,400 copies, over 4 000 more than the larger and more famous 7377 Avro Lancasters built. The Wellington was quickly found to be inadequate for a role as a daylight heavy bomber but proved highly effective in other roles as a medium bomber, both versatile and resilient. Digging Deeper Designed by inventive genius Barnes Wallis, the guy that gave…

A Brief History Today, June 15, 2017, we raise a mug and wish all of our British readers a happy Beer Day Britain, Britain’s National Beer Day. Digging Deeper The date of this relatively new holiday has been celebrated annually on 15 June since only 2015.  The founders of the holiday chose the date because 15 June is also the date that the Magna Carta, one of Britain’s most important legal documents in the island’s entire history, was sealed in 1215.  If you are wondering what the heck does the Magna Carta, a peace treaty between an unpopular king and his…

A Brief History Central Florida was rocked by its third horrific event within the past few days when an alligator snatched a 2 year old boy wading in shallow water at a Disney resort. Compounding the horror, the boy’s father tried to pull the child from the giant reptile, but the alligator was too strong, and pulled the child underwater where the boy was drowned. Digging Deeper This horror comes on the heels of the shooting death of internet and Voice singing sensation Christina Grimmie on June 11 in Orlando and the Pulse nightclub massacre on June 12, also in…

A Brief History On June 15, 1667,  Dr. Jean-Baptiste Denys, personal physician to King Louis XIV, performed the first human blood transfusion.  The patient was a 15 year old boy who had been treated by using leeches to suck out “the bad blood.” Digging Deeper Denys used about 12 oz. of Sheep’s blood and the boy lived, probably the first ever transfusion that did not kill the patient.  Trying this technique on other patients, using small quantities of sheep or cow blood so as not to overload the allergic response was not so successful and some of his patients died.…

A Brief History On June 15, 1785, Jean-Francois Pilatre de Rozier (say that 10 times fast!) and his companion, Pierre Romain became the first people to die in an aircraft accident when the  hot air balloon they were flying crashed in an attempt to cross the English Channel.  Every so often someone finds a new way to die.  After all, somebody had to be the first to die from auto erotic asphyxiation, or from drowning in a bucket.  Here we list 10 of those pioneers that invented new ways die (at least the first known person to die that way). …

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