Browsing: July 24

A Brief History On July 24, 1983, Major League Baseball experienced a strange incident that caused a furor on the field, in corporate offices, and in the homes of baseball fans all over the country when George Brett of the Kansas City Royals blasted a homerun and then had it taken away!  Stunned and outraged, Brett just about had a meltdown on the spot while the Yankee Stadium crowd roared its approval.  Referred to as “The Pine Tar Incident,” the decision to take away Brett’s homer went down in baseball lore as one wacky, weird, and wonderful incident, and here…

A Brief History In another horrible and senseless incident of an Islamic refugee invited into Germany to escape the horrors of his native land at the hands of other Muslims, a Syrian refugee blew up a suicide bomb in Ansbach, wounding at least 12 people.  The 27 year old Syrian refugee had been living in Germany for the last 2 years, although he had been denied asylum.  The bomber may have caused more death and injury had he been allowed entry to the music festival being held in the area.  Security teams later raided the bomber’s residence and a local refugee…

A Brief History On July 24, 1943, “Operation Gomorrah” began, the eradication of the City of Hamburg with “brimstone and fire from the heavens.”  Like its Biblical namesake, this operation was the purposeful destruction of a city and its inhabitants without regard for the virtues of any individuals or structures.  The entire place was a target to be razed to the ground, people included. Digging Deeper World War II had certainly already had tremendous acts of cruelty and depravity on a large scale by the time the decision to bomb Hamburg was made, but this attack marked a new Allied…

A Brief History On July 24, 1814, British forces under Phineas Riall march to the Niagara River to halt an American force from invading Canada.  The War of 1812 is misunderstood by many Americans, with most Americans assuming the US won the war, when the truth is much more like a tie at best.  The British never intended to conquer the US, as they were busy with Napoleon and bigger issues than the US.  The war was more about a punitive expedition by the British.  The final battle, after the war was over, in New Orleans was an American victory…

A Brief History On July 24, 1915, the SS Eastland, a passenger ship only 265 feet long and 38 feet wide, rolled over while tied up at dock, killing 848 people, the greatest loss of life in any Great Lakes maritime disaster. Digging Deeper The Eastland had been in service since 1903, carrying passengers from Chicago to South Haven and back for 3 years, and then back and forth from Cleveland and Cedar Point for the next 8 years.  In 1914 she changed hands again and worked the Chicago to St. Joseph, Michigan route. After the Titanic disaster, maritime safety laws…