Browsing: February 16

A Brief History On February 16, 1960, the US Navy submarine, USS Triton SSRN-586, set out on a voyage of circumnavigation of the Earth, the first time anyone had made such a voyage completely underwater!  Called Operation Sandblast, the voyage of the Triton is one of the most famous trips around the Earth that we list today, joining other pioneering events that have gone down in history as famous trips around the globe. Questions for Students (and others): Which trip around the Earth do you think is the most famous?  Which circumnavigation of the globe do you think was the…

A Brief History On February 16, 1968, the first emergency 9-1-1 (we prefer 911) system was put into service in Haleyville, Alabama, a town of about 4100 people. Part of the North American Numbering Plan (NANP) of telephone numbering systems, 911 is a rapid way for people to dial the police or emergency rescue services such as fire fighting or ambulance service. Covering the United States and Canada, 911 service is available in about 98% of all locations in these 2 countries. Digging Deeper In addition to connecting the caller with an emergency dispatcher, about 96% of the United States…

A Brief History On February 16, 1937, Wallace Carothers, chemist for the DuPont, patented the synthetic polymer based plastic known to us as Nylon.  Used as a fiber in clothing, tents, parachutes, stockings and every conceivable application, it is also used as a solid plastic as in bristles for toothbrushes (the original product), hairbrushes, car parts, household items, musical instrument strings, bullet jackets, flak jacket armor cloth, small and large gears, tire cord, Velcro tape, carpet, rope, gun stocks, fishing line and on ad infinitum!  Nylon fiber is also often used to reinforce natural fibers in cloth. Digging Deeper Ranking…

A Brief History On February 16, 1923, King Tut’s burial chamber was entered for the first time in over 3,000 years! Digging Deeper Digging deeper, we find King Tutankhamun becoming “The Boy King” at age nine in 1332 B.C. and reigning over Egypt until his death in 1323 B.C. at age nineteen rediscovered in 1922 A.D. by Howard Carter. A tremendous amount is known about Tutankhamun, who is usually referred to as “King Tut,” largely due to the wealth of information gathered from his tomb which is the least disturbed of any tomb yet found.  Techniques for discovering information about Tut include analyzing…

From the Series Lil’ History Chips On February 16, 2006, the United States Army decommissioned the last of the Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals, or MASH as they were called.  Since the Army is staffed by educated and intelligent people (mostly), they obviously had a backup plan, and that is the Combat Support Hospital (CSH pronounced cash). Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals had served the combat medical needs of the U.S. Army since their inception in 1945, continuing through the Korean and Viet Nam Wars and then in the conflicts in the Middle East until being replaced by Combat Support Hospitals. Famously depicted in the…