Browsing: April 5

A Brief History On April 5, 2019, the chilling Stephen King story, Pet Sematary (novel 1983) is ready once again for widespread release on the big screen as a reboot of the 1989 movie version.  A cautionary tale along the lines of The Monkey’s Paw, The Box, and any such “be careful what you wish for” type of stories, Pet Sematary teaches us that dead things are better left dead. Digging Deeper The gist of the story is that Louis Creed, a medical doctor, and his family, consisting of a wife (Rachel), a toddler (Gage) and a Kindergarten age daughter…

A Brief History On April 5, 2018, we have only one more day to wait for the release of the new horror film, A Quiet Place, written, directed and starring John Krasinski. A movie with a minimum of dialog, A Quiet Place adeptly manages to convey all the communication it needs, creating terrific tension and jump-scare terror along the way. Once again, our measure of audience approval was in evidence as the test audience applauded heartily at the end. Digging Deeper Krasinski not only co-wrote the script, directed and starred in the movie, but also included his real life wife…

A Brief History On April 5, 1943, B-17 Flying Fortress bombers of the American 8th Air Force proved once again that “Friendly fire is not friendly!” On several occasions, we have discussed incidents where one side in an armed conflict accidentally causes casualties to either their own people or the people of an allied nation. In this case, US bombs meant to attack a factory supplying engine parts for German warplanes hit a residential area of Mortsel, Belgium, killing 936 civilians, of which 209 were children under the age of 15. Digging Deeper The US aviators were convinced that daylight…

A Brief History Earlier today, we noted how on April 5, 1614, Pocahontas married John Rolfe.  In honor of the great historic union between not just two lovers, but people representing two culture (one English and the other Native American), we celebrate 10 of history’s most famous Native Americans, focusing on those north of what is today the border between the United States and Mexico.  A potential future list could concern famous Aztecs, Incas, and Mayans. Digging Deeper 10. Squanto Known for helping Pilgrims cope with life in North America at the Plymouth colony, Squanto went to Europe several times…

A Brief History On April 5, 1614, a milestone in European and Native American relations was reached when John Rolfe, English colonist, married Pocahontas, Native American princess! Digging Deeper The English colony of Jamestown, Virginia was the location of one of American history’s most famous marriages. Pocahontas was the daughter of Chief Powhatan, a sort of chief of chiefs in the eastern Virginia area.  In 1607, English prisoner of the local Native Americans, John Smith, was to be executed by having his head smashed with a club by Powhatan himself. Pocahontas famously (allegedly) laid her head on Smith’s head to…

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