Browsing: April 27

A Brief History On April 27, 1992, Betty Boothroyd made Women’s History by becoming the first woman elected as Speaker of the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, ending a 700 year run of a Men’s only club.  Merry Olde England (and the rest of the United Kingdom) beat Nancy Pelosi and the United States House of Representatives by a whopping 15 years in electing a woman to its top legislative post. (Nancy Pelosi, the current Speaker of the US House of Representatives, was the first and only female ever elected to that post when she took control of…

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A Brief History On April 27, 1987, the United States declared Austrian President Kurt Waldheim to be persona non grata, meaning that although Waldheim was the head of state of a free nation he would not be allowed entry to the United States.  Even more shocking, this same Kurt Waldheim had served as Secretary General of the United Nations from January of 1972 to December of 1981, in spite of having a past as an intelligence officer for the German Army during World War II in which he and his wife, Elisabeth, both were members of the Nazi party. Digging…

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A Brief History On April 27, 2011, a mind boggling 216 tornadoes ravaged the United States, from the Midwest to the South to the Northeast, all part of a larger weather phenomenon called the 2011 Super Outbreak that resulted in 306 tornadoes from April 25th to April 28th, 2011. Sadly, 348 people across the US died in the Outbreak, 324 of them from tornado activity and an additional 24 due to related thunderstorm, flash flood and lightning events. Digging Deeper The human carnage was the worst tornado related death toll since 1925, when a stunning 747 Americans were killed on…

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A Brief History On April 27, 1805, the United States Marine Corps conducted one of their first famous missions, one immortalized in the Marines’ Hymn, by taking the Tripolitan city of Derna and raising the American flag, the first time the Flag of the United States was raised on foreign soil. Digging Deeper The First Barbary War, also known as The Barbary Coast War or the Tripolitanian War, was fought by the United States against the North African states of Morocco, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli, collectively known as “The Barbary States,” the last three on the list being associate with…

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A Brief History On April 27, 33 BC, Roman politician Lucius Marcius Philippus, a step-brother to the future emperor Augustus (r. 27 BC–AD 14), celebrated a triumph for his victories while serving as governor in one of the provinces of Hispania.  The Roman triumph was a civil ceremony and religious rite of ancient Rome held to publicly celebrate and sanctify the success of a military commander who had led Roman forces to victory in the service of the state or, originally and traditionally, one who had successfully completed a foreign war. Digging Deeper Philippus ascended Rome’s ladder of political and…

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