Browsing: Crime

A Brief History Fans of the film Braveheart may recall the heir to England’s throne, future king Edward II, having eyes for men rather than his French wife, Isabella the She-wolf.  One of these men, Hugh Despenser, 1st Lord Despenser (c. 1286 – November 24, 1326), became a victim of that vengeful woman in one of history’s all-time most brutal executions, because as they say, well, sort of, “Hell hath no fury like a she-wolf scorned”! Digging Deeper Earlier on our site, we presented an article on hanging, drawing, and quartering.  As that article mentioned, the process took multiple steps…

A Brief History On this date in 1876 a public cry for justice was answered when W. M. “Boss” Tweed was turned over to legal authorities in New York city after having been captured in Spain. Digging Deeper Digging deeper, we find perhaps the most famously corrupt American government official of all time, and that is saying a lot! Holding a variety of political offices, from congressman to New York County Board of Supervisors to state senator, Tweed also held several appointed local government jobs, all of which he used to enrich himself.  He did so by selling jobs and…

A Brief History On Wednesday, November 20, 2013, FX aired the second episode of American Horror Story: Coven to feature Danny Huston as The Axeman of New Orleans, the nickname given to a never identified serial killer responsible for at least eight unsolved murders! Digging Deeper As already covered in an earlier article on our site, an earlier incarnation of American Horror Story featured two characters based on mysterious historical figures.  One later episode introduced yet another: the Axeman of New Orleans. The Axeman of New Orleans has never been identified or as far as we know even photographed (unless if you believe…

A Brief History On 16 November 1938 two young millworkers from Halifax, England were attacked by an elusive blade-wielding madman who became known as the Halifax Slasher.  For the next nine days the town was plunged into chaos as more women fell prey to the crazed assaulter.  Angry mobs started patrolling the streets and dealt out justice as they saw fit.  As Scotland Yard’s best arrived to assist with the investigation, the majority of the victims one by one confessed that their wounds were actually self inflicted – the Halifax Slasher in truth, never existed. Digging Deeper The extraordinary events…

A Brief History On November 13, 1002, English king Æthelred II the Unready ordered the killing of all Danes in England, known today as the St. Brice’s Day massacre. Digging Deeper When Æthelred became King of the English in 978, his realm had experienced repeated incursions by Danes.  The situation was so bad that the English king even had to pay tribute to Denmark’s king starting in 991.  Not surprisingly, Æthelred would eventually want some kind of way out of these humiliations.  So, he decided to take decisive action on the feast day of a fifth century Bishop of Tours.…

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