Browsing: Science & Technology

A Brief History On July 29, 1565, Mary, Queen of Scots, married her first cousin Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley. In her case, the only thing advantageous about this marriage, was that it ensured that the Scottish throne stay under the control of the House of Stuart by keeping it in the family so to say. Other that that, except for producing a son to carry on the lineage, the marriage was a complete disaster. Digging Deeper First cousins are defined as cousins who share at least one grandparent. Marriages between first cousins have taken place throughout history in both royal houses…

A Brief History On July 12, 100 B.C., Julius Caesar was born by what many believe to have been the first Caesarian section. Digging Deeper Today it is generally assumed that Caesar was not born by Caesarian section, as C-sections were only performed on dead women in Roman times, and there are many accounts of Caesar’s mother, Aurelia, being alive well into Caesar’s adulthood. So, how did this surgical procedure come to be associated with one of the greatest generals in recorded time? This belief has certainly been around a long time; and many Western names for the procedure include…

A Brief History On this day, July 6, 1893, the town of Pomeroy, Iowa, was almost completely destroyed by a massive tornado! Digging Deeper Named for landowner and congressman Charles W. Pomeroy (September 3, 1825 – February 11, 1891), the town’s history dates back to at least the 1870s when a railroad was planned to be built through the Iowa settlement.  As the town’s official website notes, this railroad “bridged the gap between small rural towns and larger cities” by taking “passengers to Fort Dodge and” hauling “cattle to Chicago.” After a couple decades of prosperity, tragedy descended upon the town on July 6, 1893.  In the heat…

A Brief History On May 30, 1914, the British ocean liner RMS Aquitania made her maiden voyage.  Larger than the Titanic, this giant was known as “Ship Beautiful” for self-descriptive reasons.  Serving in both World Wars, she was the last of the great 4-funnel (smokestack) liners and was the longest serving liner in history until surpassed by the Queen Elizabeth II.  Obviously famous in her day, the Aquitania is not well remembered, unlike the other 10 ships we list here whose fame has stood the test of time.  What other ships do you think belong here?  (Real ships only please, fictional…

A Brief History On May 5, 1809, Mary Kies became the first woman granted a US patent. She had invented a process for weaving straw with silk and thread. Over the years women have showed ingenuity and we would like to tell you about 10 of them. Please give us your nominations for women and their inventions (Hint: There are a lot!) you think should have been on the list. (Honorary Mention: Eve, The Headache, Day 6. Not only did she invent how to get one, but how to give one as well!) Digging Deeper 10. Mellitta Bentz, Paper Coffee…

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