Browsing: March 3

A Brief History On March 3, 1951, music history was made when the first song deemed to be “rock and roll” was recorded.  Called “Rocket 88,” the lively song was recorded by Chess Records at Sam Phillip’s studio in Memphis and is credited to Jackie Brenston and the Delta Cats who were actually Ike Turners’s band, the Kings of Rhythm.  In fact, the song was written by Brenston and Turner, though Turner was not originally credited.  As we know, the Rock and Roll genre of music has taken off ever since then, especially with the gyrations of Elvis Presley bringing…

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A Brief History On March 3, 1885, American Telephone and Telegraph Company was formed to provide the first telephone services to a wide audience, but what came before? Development of communication takes three main stages. The most basic was oral communication that then opened the way for written communication and eventually, digital era communication. Whenever I want someone to do my work, I hire professionals who understand academic writing. Digging Deeper Oral Stages of Communication Human beings must have been communicating using gestures and instincts at the beginning. The use of speech began in 500,000 BC. The ideas were not…

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A Brief History On March 2 and 3, 1859, the largest sale of African slaves in the United States came to a sad conclusion near Savannah, Georgia when the last slaves formerly owned by plantation owner Pierce Mease Butler (1807/10-1867) were sold in order for Butler to satisfy his considerable debts.  Known to history as The Great Slave Auction or alternatively as The Weeping Time, a total of 436 human beings were sold like pieces of property.  Soon, the US Civil War would be fought, and slavery would end in the United States, preventing any such future crimes against humanity…

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A Brief History On March 3, 2005, Steve Fossett of the USA made a non-stop, unrefueled solo flight around the globe, the first person in aviation history to achieve that particular milestone.  Already 60 years old at the time of his historic flight, Fossett died tragically only 2 ½ years later, predictably in a plane crash. Digging Deeper Born in Tennessee, Fossett grew up in California, attending Garden Grove High School and was educated at Stanford University for undergraduate work and at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri for grad school where he earned an MBA. Like his father, Fossett…

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A Brief History On March 3, 1776, the Continental Navy and Continental Marines, the forces that would become the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps, conducted the first amphibious operation in US military history when a raid on Nassau in the Bahamas was conducted, known as The Raid on Nassau or sometimes called The Battle of Nassau. Digging Deeper Marines in general and the United States Marine Corps in particular are a military force of fighting men (and today, women as well) that are considered a ‘naval’ military service and work closely with the Navy.  Marines are used…

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