Browsing: Health/Medicine

A Brief History On December 28, 1895, the world of medicine and airport security were forever changed when William Roentgen published his paper describing the production of x-rays. Digging Deeper Digging deeper, we find Roentgen, a German physicist, having invented a machine to produce electro-magnetic radiation emitting x-rays. Sometimes called Roentgen Rays in honor of their discoverer, his research and careful documentation led to Roentgen receiving the first Nobel Prize for Physics. Quickly seizing the opportunity his research afforded him, Roentgen developed a way to pass x-rays through an object and onto a target material to create a picture of…

A Brief History On December 19, 1956, Dr. John Bodkins Adams was accused of murdering 160 (or more!) of his patients! Digging Deeper Digging deeper, we find Dr. Bodkins practicing medicine in Sussex, England when suspicions began about his practice. Never considered a “good” doctor, Adams was a poor student and considered a sloppy and inefficient doctor, although for some reason he made spectacular sums of money.  Not being accepted as a worthy peer by other doctors should have been a clue! Odd facets of Adams practice surfaced, such as being named in at least 132 of their wills.  His…

A Brief History On this date, December 10, 1907, a long running feud between the medical community and anti-vivisectionist activists boiled over into the worst of the riots and disturbances over the statue of a dog! Digging Deeper Digging deeper we find the turn of the century London medical community leaving the dark ages of medicine and trying to approach something more like the research we have today. Part of that scientific quest included the practice of vivisection, dissecting animals while they are still alive.  This practice was used for research and also for the instruction of medical students, and…

A Brief History From October 2, 1919 and for some weeks afterwards, First Lady Edith Wilson (October 15, 1872 — December 28, 1961) unofficially ran the U.S. government following her husband’s (then President Woodrow Wilson’s) life-changing stroke. Digging Deeper In the aftermath of America’s participation in what was then the world’s worst war (World War I) and his diplomatic wrangling at the Paris Peace Conference that followed the war’s conclusion in 1919, a worn-out President Wilson returned to America only to experience a series of medical crises.  First, he endured a bout of influenza early in the year.  Second, on…

A Brief History On this day, September 23, 1968, a man eventually canonized as a saint passed away…after having apparently endured the stigmata for several years! Digging Deeper Saint Pio of Pietrelcina (May 25, 1887 – September 23, 1968), a Catholic priest from Italy, was canonized as a saint by Pope John Paul II the Great in 2002, but his saintly life began over  a century earlier… Saint Pio claimed that he began his devotion to God from the young age of just five!  His mother claimed that the young Pio could see and speak with both Jesus and the Virgin…

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