Browsing: February 7

A Brief History On February 7, 1795, the 12th state need to ratify the 11th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States (North Carolina) voted to ratify the Amendment, thus making it part of the law of the land. The 11th Amendment was the first Amendment to be ratified since the adoption of the Bill of Rights (Amendments 1-10). Digging Deeper The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law of our nation, and all other laws and court decisions must be in accordance with the Constitution. It is the job of the Supreme Court of the US…

A Brief History On February 7, 1497, the followers of Dominican priest Girolamo Savonarola of Florence, Italy, gathered and burned a large quantity of objects they referred to as “vanities,” objects such as cosmetics, books, artwork, mirrors, fancy clothes, playing cards, and musical instruments, any objects these religious zealots thought could lead people to sin. Digging Deeper Misguided people have engaged in burning books and other artifacts that they have seen as contrary to their view of what is “proper,” “right,” or “moral” throughout history, and of course the Florence incident was not the first or largest of these burnings,…

A Brief History On February 7, 1885, one of the first great industrialists to bring Japan from a backwater third world nation to a modern industrial giant died of stomach cancer.  The founder of the giant Mitsubishi Company, Iwasaki Yataro left the company in the hands of his brother. Digging Deeper Born in 1835, Yataro had humble roots, and his education was cut short when he was sent to prison at age 19 for accusing a local government official of corruption concerning a dispute with Yataro’s father.  After serving a 7 month prison term, Yataro found it hard to find…

From the Series Lil’ History Chips February 7, 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the beginning of the “British Invasion,” a period in which British rock and roll musicians flooded the United States, starting with the greatest of them all, The Beatles. Arriving to throngs of adoring, screaming and crying girls and young women, the “Fab Four” made their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show 2 days later. “Beatlemania” was born and America officially conquered!  From 1964 to 1970, the “mop tops” ruled the air waves and record stores like no other group before or since.  Even songs about The Beatles were played…

A Brief history On February 7, 1882, John L. Sullivan became the last of the bare-knuckle boxing champions with an eighth-round knockout of Paddy Ryan. Digging Deeper Digging deeper, we find Sullivan, known as “The Boston Strong Boy,” fighting his way across America challenging any man any time any where! His victory in Mississippi over Paddy Ryan, the man recognized as the heavyweight boxing champion of America, if not the world, made Sullivan the last of the bare-knuckle champs and the first of the gloved boxing champs. Sullivan fought all comers, including Europeans, giving him legitimate claim as “world champion.”  Fighting…