Browsing: Literature

A Brief History Below is a partial list of fictional characters who have died in American comic books, specifically in the superhero genre, and, so far, have not returned. Digging Deeper Characters frequently die in comic books, but are also frequently resurrected. A death that is reversed is called a comic book death. Writer Peter David splits the blame for this phenomenon among creators, publishers and fans. Creators and publishers kill characters to increase drama and sales and to meet the demands of readers who call for evil or unpopular characters be killed. However, if a popular character is killed, fans often ask for his or her resurrection…

A Brief History A healing factor is the ability of some characters in fiction to recover from bodily injuries or disease at a superhuman rate. Since the introduction of Wolverine by Marvel Comics in 1974 and inspired by the immense popularity of the character, superhuman healing has become a fairly common power featured in comic books, novels, television, film, and other media. The overall efficiency of a character’s healing factor often fluctuates due to various writers applying a very broad degree of artistic license. Weapon X has been established, on multiple accounts for having the fastest healing factor over all mutants, with the exception of external factors. As a result, especially concerning characters depicted in comic books,…

A Brief History On March 10, 2019, we offer a mini-review of the latest Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) blockbuster film Captain Marvel.  Unfortunately, even prior to the release of the movie on March 8, 2019, coincidentally International Women’s Day, tremendous flak developed over the star, Actress Brie Larson, making comments seen by some as anti-White Male.  The result of the fallout from Larson’s unfortunate comments has been extreme, with scathing articles and reviews denouncing the film, often by people that did not even see the movie!  Robo-reviews and comments on blogs and movie sites have flooded the media, both with…

A Brief History On March 7, 1876, Alexander Graham Bell received a patent for his invention he called the “telephone.”  Far from the device people today cannot seem to drive a car or eat dinner without, the original model did not even have push buttons or an LCD screen!  No wonder people had a hard time adapting to the new technology.  For example, how does one answer a phone?  Invent something and a new problem is created.  Bell’s answer to answering the phone was to loudly state a brisk, “Ahoy, hoy!”  Really, no kidding.  The guy that invented the telephone…

A Brief History On February 6, 60 AD, in the Roman city of Pompeii, an unknown graffiti artist noted that the day was “dies Solis” (Sunday), the first known instance of being able to attach a date to a day of the week.  While this bit of graffito is the earliest recorded account of a day and date being matched up, people had been naming days of the week prior to this incident.  The Romans called Sunday “dies Solis” meaning day of the Sun.  Read on for more about what the names of each day of the week mean and…

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