Browsing: Society

A Brief History On January 25, 1585, Walter Raleigh, an English explorer and adventurer, was knighted by Queen Elizabeth I of England, perhaps because he named a region of North America “Virginia” in honor of the Virgin Queen. Digging Deeper Helping to suppress Irish rebellion, defending England against the Spanish Armada, and being a key figure in the colonization of North America, Raleigh became somewhat of a celebrity of his time, although he also had some problems along the way. Plunked into jail for marrying without the Queen’s permission, Raleigh was released and chased after the mythical city of gold,…

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A Brief History On January 24, 2023, the dreaded Doomsday Clock that charts the danger of nuclear war has been moved to within 90 seconds of “Midnight,” the ominous harbinger of nuclear disaster. Digging Deeper In case you are wondering, the Doomsday Clock is maintained by the Science and Security Board of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists in order to provide a graphic depiction of their estimation of the danger of an imminent catastrophic nuclear war.  The ongoing Russian-Ukrainian War has pushed the world closer to nuclear Armageddon than ever before, at least in their estimation. What do you…

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A Brief History On January 23, 1570, history of the infamous type was made when James Stewart, the Earl of Moray, was murdered by an assassin using a firearm.  Stewart was acting as regent for the young King James VI of Scotland. Digging Deeper James VI became King of Scotland at the age of 1 year old when his mother, Mary, Queen of Scots, abdicated the throne.  James Stewart was himself the illegitimate son of King James V of Scotland.  Ongoing resentment of Mary’s supporters bode ill for her successors. At the town of Linlithgow, the Earl was passing in…

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A Brief History On January 17, 2013, renowned American cyclist Lance Armstrong admitted on Oprah’s Next Chapter, a prime time television show, that he was, as suspected and accused, a cheater that won 7 consecutive Tour de France bicycle races through the assistance of banned drugs. Digging Deeper Professional and amateur athletes have been using performance enhancing drugs for decades now, including stimulants such as cocaine and amphetamines and a variety of hormones, usually characterized as “steroids.”  Other banned substances include “blood doping” agents that increase the ability of blood to carry oxygen and even gene manipulation to enhance performance. …

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A Brief History On January 16, 1537, an armed insurrection took place in England, specifically in Cumberland and Westmorland, pitting unhappy Roman Catholics against the blasphemous King Henry VIII. Digging Deeper Known as “Bigod’s Rebellion,” this religious war sounds mighty close to “By God’s,” a somehow almost appropriate name.  The name of the rebellion actually derived from Sir Francis Bigod, a leader of the revolt. King Henry VIII had infamously disbanded the Catholic Church in England and started his own brand of Christianity, later called The Church of England, in order to legitimize his marital wishes.  The rebellion failed in…

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