Browsing: Lifestyle

A Brief History On January 13, 2012, the woes of the cruise lines of the world became as bad as they can get when a giant Italian cruise ship was wrecked off the coast of Isola del Giglio in the Tyrrhenian Sea (part of the Mediterranean Sea to the West of Italy) taking 32 lives in the accident.  The ship, Costa Concordia, was operated by a subsidiary of Carnival Cruise Lines called Costa Crociere and had only been in service for 6 years when she was run aground and lost, joining a long list of miserable cruise ship experiences in…

A Brief History On December 31, 2018, History and Headlines takes a look at one of the most popular New Year’s Resolutions that Americans claim to be dedicated to, at least as tallied by Google searches.  That resolution is to develop a healthier lifestyle, by losing weight, exercising, reducing stress and eating healthier.  We take a few minutes to offer some advice on how to achieve the goal of improving one’s health in a variety of ways.  Please feel free to offer any particularly good advice you believe may be helpful to other readers.  If you think we have offered…

A Brief History On December 30, 2018, we at History and Headlines take a moment to remember some of the notable people that died this year.  (Yes, we know there is an entire day left in the year, so we will update the article to include any last minute deaths of note.)  As always, we invite you, the reader, to nominate any other worthy people that died in 2018 that we neglected to mention, especially as we are not trying to name every single person of minimal celebrity that died.  If you choose to mention a person that died, please…

A Brief History On December 29, 1890, the United States Army 7th Cavalry Regiment conducted a massacre of about 200 Native Americans at a place called Wounded Knee in South Dakota, (see our article “Wounded Knee Massacre”).  We contend that the name, Wounded Knee, is a bit on the odd side.  After all, should other places be named “Headache,” “Sore Butt,” or “Infected Toe Mountain?”  Geographical places or formations, whether of a national or local variety have often been named for one reason or another in a way that seems a little odd to us that speak English.  (Or is…

A Brief History On December 27, 1966, the largest cave in the world was discovered in Aquismón, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.  Boasting a single cavern that covers a ground space of 994 feet long by 442 feet wide, the so called Cave of Swallows (alternately called “The Cave of the Swallows”) had been known for many generations by indigenous Huastec people, and was considered “discovered” only when a documented descent into the cave was made by T. R. Evans, Charles Borland and Randy Sterns, the first outsiders known to have visited the cave. Digging Deeper Known as a “pit” type…

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