Search Results: battle of negro fort (18)

A Brief History On July 7, 1456, Joan of Arc (Jeanne d’Arc) was acquitted of heresy.  Unfortunately, the acquittal came 25 years after she was convicted of heresy and burned at the stake.  Every so often someone gets railroaded into being executed, imprisoned, or discredited, often to the point of having their life and reputation ruined only to be vindicated later, sometimes even becoming a hero.  Here we list 10 such people.  (So many people have been condemned to death or life in prison that turned out to be innocent you would need a book to list them.) Digging Deeper…

A Brief History This article serves as a sort of table of contents to other articles on this site by presenting a chronological listing of bizarre events in the history of civil rights.  For the purpose of this timeline, we are expanding “civil rights” to include “natural rights,” “gay rights,” and “women’s rights” rather than just limiting the timeline to “African-American rights”. Digging Deeper On April 22, 1775, Patrick Henry delivered a speech that may well have led to the successful formation of the United States.  Known as the “Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death” speech, Henry was addressing…

A Brief History “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” is a short story of speculative fiction by American author Washington Irving (April 3, 1783 – November 28, 1859), contained in his collection of essays and short stories entitled The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent (1819-1820).  Although written while Irving was living in Birmingham, England, “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” is among the earliest examples of American fiction with enduring popularity, especially during the Halloween season.  To that end, the short story is an excellent example of the creation of American culture in the early 19th century! Digging Deeper: “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow”…