Browsing: July 14

A Brief History On July 14, 1789, Scottish explorer Sir Alexander Mackenzie finally reached the mouth of the river named after him, a failed attempt to find a route to the Pacific Ocean.  The Mackenzie River is the longest river in Canada, and is the second longest North American river system (to the Mississippi), flowing for 1080 miles into the Arctic Ocean.  Here we list 10 North American Rivers Named After a Person.  Since most rivers are not named after people, those that are drop off considerably in size/length after those listed here.  What rivers would you add to the…

A Brief History On the evening of 14 July 2016, Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, an African-born Islamist immigrant to France, deliberately drove a 19-tonne cargo truck into crowds celebrating Bastille Day on the Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France killing 84 people and injuring more than 300.  Bouhlel was then shot and killed by hero police.  Due to his high number of victims, Bouhlel is unquestionably the most despicable scumbag of the year so far. Digging Deeper This loser was a Tunisian living in Nice, France and at age 31 was divorced with 3 kids.  According to his father, Mohamed was not religious, but had been…

A Brief History On July 14, 2004, Robert Novak of the Washington Post exercised irresponsible journalistic ethics by publishing an article outing Valerie Plame as a CIA operative. Digging Deeper Plame was the wife of Ambassador Joseph Wilson, a career diplomat that had been the US Ambassador to a few minor countries and had served other diplomatic roles.  Plame, who was already a CIA agent when she married Wilson, was used to good advantage by the CIA with her husband providing diplomatic cover. All that changed when Wilson angered the administration of George W. Bush by publicly opposing the expected invasion of…

A Brief History On July 14, 1933, the Nazi Party that had just taken power in Germany began a program of eugenics with their institution of The Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Diseased Offspring.  This law demanded the sterilization of any person deemed to have a genetic disorder. Digging Deeper The alleged goal of the this program was a purification of the gene pool, with allowing genetically “fit” people to reproduce abundantly without their children having to compete for valuable resources with genetically inferior children.  Achieving this goal would theoretically make the German people and thus the German state…

A Brief History On July 14, 1881, the outlaw known as Billy the Kid was shot and killed by Sheriff Pat Garret in New Mexico.  The Kid was a wild one, having killed at least 8 men and possibly many more (legend says 21) by the time he was 21 years old.  The West was called Wild for a reason.  Outlaws and rough justice were the way of life and battles between ranchers, rustlers, cattlemen, and robbers were not rare.  Here we list 10 of the wildest of the characters that made the West Wild.  Who would you add to the list? Digging Deeper…