Browsing: Literature

A Brief History On January 18, 2018, as we do every January 18th, we celebrate Winnie-the-Pooh Day, our favorite children’s books character and animated star.  Of course, we celebrate Christopher Robin and all of his and Pooh’s friends as well.  Why January 18th?  Because the creator of Pooh and friends was AA Milne, born on January 18, 1882.  A playwright and World War I veteran, Milne first wrote about Winnie in 1926 (an earlier version, Edward the Bear in 1924), a combination of his writing and illustrations by EH Shepard, work that changed Milne’s life and the lives of countless…

A Brief History On June 20, 1890, The Picture of Dorian Gray, a philosophical novel by Oscar Wilde, was first published complete in the July 1890 issue of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine.  This article provides a list of cultural references in Wilde’s novel. Digging Deeper Individual persons referred in the novel The number of each chapter of The Picture of Dorian Gray in which an individual person is referred is in parentheses alongside his or her name. The chapter numbers are specific to the revised edition of the novel, first published in April 1891. Fictitious (created by Oscar Wilde) Seventy-one fictional characters, named in the novel, are Oscar Wilde’s creations, and…

A Brief History On January 10, 1776, the pamphlet Common Sense by American patriot Thomas Paine was published.  This persuasive document was widely read by Americans, encouraged to declare independence from an overbearing British colonial government.  Some books, pamphlets, manifestos, essays, and other written documents over the years have helped mold History.  Today we list 12 of those important works.  What other writings would you add to the list? Digging Deeper 1.  Common Sense, Thomas Paine, 1776. Paine was a radical with little patience of tolerance of those that disagreed with him, and his forceful writings helped convince Americans to…

A Brief History On January 3, 2000, the final new comic strip of the Peanuts (Charlie Brown, et al) series was published in the nation’s newspapers, ending a 50 year run as an iconic funny papers staple.  Less than a month later, the strip’s creator, Charles M. Schulz, died of colon cancer at the age of 77.  We still see “reruns” of Peanuts comic strips, but the days of getting new strips are long gone, as are the days of many other bygone comic strips that were once something for Americans to look forward to in the comics section of…

A Brief History The Jungle is a 1906 novel written by the American journalist and novelist Upton Sinclair (1878–1968). Sinclair wrote the novel to portray the harsh conditions and exploited lives of immigrants in the United States in Chicago and similar industrialized cities. Perhaps his main goal in exposing the meat industry and working conditions was to advance Socialism in the United States; however, most readers were more concerned with his exposure of health violations and unsanitary practices in the American meatpacking industry during the early 20th century, greatly contributing to a public outcry which led to reforms including the Meat Inspection Act. Sinclair famously said of the public…