Browsing: May 2

A Brief History On May 2, 2020, we look back to 2008, when a British man was convicted of the horrendous crime of incest with his 2 daughters, sexual unions (rapes actually) that resulted in the birth of 7 children!  This domestic rapist kept up his sexual predation for a whopping 25 years before it was finally stopped, earning his sordid affair the nickname of “Sheffield incest case.” Digging Deeper The identity of this candidate for Bad Father of the Year has been concealed by the British courts in order to protect the privacy of both of his daughters and…

Read More

A Brief History On May 2, 1945, an American Artillery Battalion intercepted a death march of concentration camp inmates being taken from the Dachau concentration camp to the Austrian border, in turn saving the lives of hundreds of the starving inmates.  The rescuers must have seemed like angels sent directly from heaven to the doomed inmates,  and even more surprising to those lucky survivors, the Americans that saved them were all of Japanese ancestry, part of the 522nd Field Artillery Battalion, a subunit of the 442nd Infantry Regiment that was composed of Nisei, second generation Japanese Americans. Digging Deeper While…

Read More

A Brief History On May 2, 1918, General Motors Corporation acquired the Delaware based Chevrolet Motor Company, its last major car company acquisition for decades. GM would grow to be the largest car manufacturer in the world from 1931 to 2007, a 77 year reign as king of the automakers no other company has matched. In recent years GM vies with Toyota and Volkswagen for the championship auto manufacturer title, with strong competition from Ford Motor Company, Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi, and Fiat-Chrysler (which also makes Jeep and Dodge among its nameplates). GM sells about 8 to 10 million cars per year world-wide,…

Read More

A Brief History On May 2, 1964, before even the Gulf of Tonkin Incident that heralded major US involvement in the Vietnam War, a Viet Cong or North Vietnamese frogman placed an explosive charge against the hull of the USS Card (USNS Card at the time of sinking), blowing a hole in the ship and sinking 48 feet as she lay berthed at the dock at Saigon. Digging Deeper The USS Card started life in 1942 as ACV-11 (Auxiliary Aircraft Carrier) after being laid down as a cargo ship.  Just under 10,000 tons and just under 500 feet long, the…

Read More

A Brief History On May 2, 1863, the Confederate States of America lost their best or second best general, because they shot him! Digging Deeper The not so United States engaged in a titanic Civil War between the Federal Government (Union) and the secessionist Confederate (Southern) states. At the battle of Chancellorsville General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was reentering his own lines when pickets (sentries) mistook him for a “yankee” and shot him in the arm. Jackson’s arm had to be amputated, and as so often in those days, pneumonia set in and Jackson died 8 days later, robbing Robert E.…

Read More