Browsing: February 2

A Brief History On February 2, 1935, Leonarde “Nard” Keeler testified about polygraph evidence in a Wisconsin courtroom at a trial of 2 men for assault, the first use of the polygraph, often simply called “the lie detector,” in court. Then, as now, debate about the efficacy of the polygraph was fiercely defended on both sides. Digging Deeper Keeler was the co-inventor of the polygraph, a machine that measures bodily functions in response to questions being asked the subject of the test, the reaction of those functions supposedly indicating whether the subject is telling the truth or a lie. Bodily…

A Brief History On February 2, 1876, the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs was founded, replacing the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players, which had been founded in 1871 as a replacement itself for the National Association of Base Ball Players (note no mention of “professional”) which operated from 1869 to 1871. Digging Deeper Known today as Major League Baseball’s “Senior Circuit” as simply the National League, the original league had 8 teams, including Chicago White Stockings (which actually became the Cubs, not the White Sox!), the Louisville Grays, the Philadelphia Athletics (not the ones that became the…

This Just In! Earlier today, we posted an article about last year’s Groundhog Day debacle in which New York City’s mayor Bill de Blasio managed to accidentally kill a groundhog named Charlotte.  That is right, New York’s police are not the only ones Mayor de Blasio has “let down”! This year, however, the most famous of all groundhogs, Pennsylvania’s Punxsutawney Phil, got his apparent revenge for groundhog kind on all of us humans.  We are saddened to report that Phil saw his shadow and thereby predicted six more weeks of what has already been a most unpleasant winter.  In Northeast…

A Brief History In the night of what is believed to be February 2, 1959, 9 Russian university students hiking and skiing in the wilderness of the Ural mountains died mysteriously.  Theories for their demise range from natural disasters to a government or military cover up and even to an encounter with aliens or the Russian bigfoot known as Yeti. Digging Deeper Found weeks later, after a massive search effort had been launched, the bodies of the 9 students, 7 men and 2 women were located outside of their tent which they had hurriedly fled by cutting an opening from the inside.  They…

From the Series Lil’ History Chips One year ago today, on February 2, 2014, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio fumbled the unfortunate groundhog Charlotte, dropping the marmot on her head during a Groundhog Day ceremony. Typical of politically-staged events, the lies started right away when the groundhog was called “Chuck,” when in reality it was a female named Charlotte who had been provided for the event by the Staten Island Zoo.  Bad enough the public saw the mayor drop the hapless rodent, but the lies continued when the poor animal died about a week later.  Although a necropsy revealed the…

1 2