Browsing: December 7

A Brief History On December 7, 1999, A&M Records, Inc. filed a Federal lawsuit against the music sharing online giant, Napster. Napster, created on June 1, 1999, by Shawn Fanning and Sean Parker, as a music sharing online platform in which millions of music lovers across the country and the world were able to download the latest musical releases at no cost to themselves, and by default no profit to the music/recording industry.  As the saying goes, “There is no free lunch.”  Another apropos saying, “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is…” also applies, for it did…

A Brief History On December 7, 2005, former Cleveland Browns head coach Bud Carson, a lifetime heavy smoker, died of emphysema at the age of 75.  In 1989, Carson had led the Browns, once the NFL’s premier franchise and today perhaps the worst team of all time, to the AFC Conference Championship Game, the third time in a 4 year period that the Browns would be one win from making it to the Super Bowl for the first time in their history. Digging Deeper The Browns started life in 1946 as a team in the All-America Football Conference, a rival…

A Brief History On December 7, 1941, the Naval and Air Forces of the Empire of Japan conducted a sneak attack against the US military bases on Oahu and especially at Pearl Harbor. President Franklin Roosevelt called December 7, 1941, “a date that will live in infamy.” He was certainly right, and it has, perhaps more than any other date in the calendar as far as Americans are concerned. Here we list 10 Dates That Live in American Infamy. Feel free to debate the order or content of the list, and tell us which dates belong and which do not. …

A Brief History On December 7, 1982, the State of Texas executed convicted murderer Charles Brooks, Jr. by lethal injection, the first such execution in US history. Lethal injection would go on to become the preferred method of execution in the US until the 21st Century when serious problems manifested themselves. Digging Deeper Prior to lethal injection, the Federal government and state governments used a variety of methods of execution, from hanging and firing squads to the electric chair and the gas chamber. These methods were all deemed to be “humane,” at least compared to the barbaric methods previously employed…

A Brief History On December 7, 1941, the Imperial Japanese Navy conducted a devastating surprise attack on the Pearl Harbor Naval Base and the Hickam Field Airbase on the island of Oahu, Hawaii.  Digging Deeper American Naval and Army forces were caught by surprise that fateful sunny Sunday morning and paid a terrible price for their lack of vigilance.  All the American battleships were either sunk or disabled.  Of the 390 warplanes, 188 were destroyed and 159 damaged.  Over 2,400 Americans died.  The Japanese were met with some token anti-aircraft fire and air-to-air interception, but the results were scant.  One U.S. destroyer managed…

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