Search Results: Jews (130)

A Brief History Today, as the United States and the rest of the world continues to be ravaged by the Covid-19 pandemic, we look back to a previous pandemic of enormously greater proportions, the infamous Black Death of Bubonic Plague that ravaged much of the world in the 14th Century.  Panicked populations, desperate for answers and solutions to the deadly plague, took to blaming Europe’s Jewish population as the cause of the calamity, a scapegoating of Jews common throughout history.  The pervasive theme of blaming various catastrophes on Jews made the scapegoating of the Black Death an almost foregone conclusion! …

A Brief History On July 18, 1290, King Edward I of England, also known as “Edward Longshanks” or alternatively “The Hammer of the Scots,” issued the Edict of Expulsion, a royal decree ordering all Jews out of England.  At the time, about 16,000 Jews resided in not so Merry Old England.  Along with so many other pogroms, massacres, and forcible expulsions, Jewish people have had such a history of discrimination and exclusion that they have their own day of fasting and remembrance of various calamities and disasters, called Tisha B’Av, known as the “saddest day on the Jewish calendar.” Digging…

A Brief History On May 18, 1096, Christians in Europe heeded the call of Pope Urban II and joined up with the throngs following local noblemen in a Crusade to regain the Holy Land of Jerusalem from the Muslims that occupied what is now Israel and the Levant, but on this day the Crusading zeal went in a horribly different direction. Digging Deeper Count Emicho of Leiningen had gathered his forces to serve the cause of God in the People’s Crusade (First Crusade), though it seems his personal goal was to rid Germany of its Jewish population. On May 18,…

A Brief History On November 9, 694, the Seventeenth Council of Toledo opened, a third round ordered by Egica, King of the Visigoths (Spain), a council of Bishops of the Christian Church. Not surprisingly for any such council before the Renaissance, the main topic was just how bad the Jews are and what should be done about them. Digging Deeper A profoundly anti-Jewish King, Egica claimed that he had “heard” that Jews outside of Iberia were plotting to overthrow their Christian masters, and that Jews in Iberia were somehow being contaminated by those plots. Thus, the main point of the…

A Brief History On April 20, 1657, the Dutch masters of the colony of New Amsterdam, later to become New York City, made the historic move of granting religious freedom to two dozen Jewish refugees that had fled oppression in Recife, Holland, in 1654 when the Portuguese conquered that city. Digging Deeper This humble beginnings of the New York Jewish population was opposed by Peter Stuyvesant, the Director of New Amsterdam.  Fortunately for the refugees, the Dutch West India Company headquartered back in Amsterdam saw otherwise and ordered the Jewish refugees be given sanctuary.  By 1661 the first Jew to…

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